Categories
Adoption Advocacy and Activism Advocacy and Activism Created for Rescues and Non-Profits Get informed and Educated Get informed and educated News Non - Profits Shelter Animals

Toni Eakes and the truth about A wish for Animals rescue

Hello dear animal lovers and friends,

In  2012 I wrote an article about Toni Eakes and her rescue and she threatened to sue me and I had to take it down.

I left this short post up to let people know why I took the previous post down.

For whatever reason, maybe because the universe wants it, this post ranks #1 in google when you search for “Toni Eakes” and I receive countless emails, phone calls  and blog comments from people seeking help with all kind of issues revolving around Toni Eakes and her rescue “A wish for animals”

I never worked with her or met her, but due to this overwhelming flood of people and authorities looking for help or information about her, I felt the urge to publish some of the emails sent to me without publishing names.

You decide whether you want to work with her, adopt from her or volunteer for her. I’m just helping the public and the animals in sharing these emails.

  1. Hello, I tried reading your blog but looks like it was taken down. I fostered for Toni 2 years ago in October of 2013. It was the worst experience of my life. I was wondering what your blog had said. I’d love to know that I wasn’t the only one who got screwed by her then harassed and threatened Thanks

  2. Toni Eake’s facility is actually located at 5930 jasmine St in Riverside. Its a hell hole.

  3. I worked for her and stayed at her property. Animal control was there the day I took these pics and did nothing. I’ve called everyone and sent these pics. Police and animal control don’t seem to want to help. Dogs with mange ticks injuries and illness. What more do they need to see? The matted dog was aced and shaved by a volunteer. Toni asked me to do it and I told her to have him anesthetized and groomed by a vet. Instead she bought ace promazine and had a volunteer do it. The last pic is what he looked like before they attempted to do anything. He came to the kennel clean and developed the mats over months in her care. Last Tuesday the director of services,  Frank Corvina told me he sent officers to the property the previous day to check on a litter of five week old puppies that were dehydrated to the point where the volunteers were giving sub cutaneous fluids to them. A volunteer informed me AC never even came.

  4. I would like to get a copy of your article.  I have been in rescue for many years and known that she was bad but i need to show others occasionally .  Thanks

  5. Hi. Can you please tell me more about Toni Eakes? A Wish for Animals has been pulling dogs with high pledges from southern California shelters. And most recently one of the dogs was deemed aggressive. The foster can no longer keep the dog and the rescue isn’t cooperating in taking the dog back. Any insights would be much appreciated. Thank you.

  6. To whom it may concern,
    Good morning, my name is L. and I am a proud Pitty adopter for the second time. In doing research on google about a Wish for Animals I found your post about having to take down the article about Toni Eakes. I unfortunately made the mistake of adopting a rescue from her and it may turn into a legal issue. What should be a joyous and happy event has turned into one of the worst experiences I have ever had.  I was wondering if you could help with some information and or any help in dealing with this group. Thank you.
  7. Hello, a woman has asked us for help with a foster she has had that belongs to Toni Eakes. This woman has paid for EVERYTHING for this dog. Toni has given her $0 towards the dog. She has had him over a year now. She must move & contacted Toni.Toni won’t take the dog back. Toni told the foster that she is in breach & is abandoning the dog. I always thought the rescue is the owner!  When the foster said she would re home the dog Toni told her that’s illegal cos she owns the dog. Whatever! I need some info so I know what to do to help this foster.

  8. Hi, I hesitate to write to you because quite frankly, the woman scares me.  However, I couldn’t agree more that she shouldn’t be involved in animal welfare.  I have a long sorted story regarding my experience with her and since it isn’t over, I would rather not go into details about it in this email. In fact, I would be much more comfortable talking about it, than writing it since I want to avoid a retaliation from her.  Once my involvement with her is over, I would like to help in whatever way I can, as well as sharing my story on your comment board.  In the end, there needs to be a way to get the word out about her.

  9. Hi thank you for responding. I recently adopted a dog with Toni and it turned into a nightmare. The dog was nothing like the dog that they described when I adopted him. He was not neutered, vaccinated, or microchipped. I was told that’s what the $350 paid for but Toni never returned my calls when I tried to contact her about getting these things done. Toni never responded to any of my communications. He got aggressive around my 5 year old and all other dogs.  He also bit my parents docile elder dog on several occasions. When I contactedToni saying this wasn’t the right home for the dog she got so defensive that she turned it all around on me. Verbally attacked me and said I had made the dog act that way and that I had put the dog in danger. She insisted that I return him by the end of that day. She was unwilling to refund my $350 so I could adopt another dog. I I cannot believe she gets away with it. I have been told to take her to small claims court but not sure if I will win because she says what I paid was a donation to a non-profit organization. Very frustrating. Thank you for the info!

  10. Hi, I am very concerned and discouraged after working withToni on Saturday. I would appreciate a phone call or and email with any information that can be provided.

  11. Hi, Thank you for putting an article together about Ms. Toni Eakes. I thought her lawyer might have contacted you and that is why I could not read the article. I met Ms. Eakes two years ago and the experience was horrible. I have a dog that is now, in decent health this is of course spending over 15,000. The story is a long one and I ended up going on a mission because of her crueltyto animals to get her shut down and I had no luck. I appreciate you taking the time to write an article and hope one day she will be stopped.

  12. Thank you for sharing. I was the one that called animal control on her in 2010 for the place in Laguna Hills. I had a report on her from Orange County Animal Control over 500 pages. I followed her for a awhile and called animal control at her home which again, animal control stepped in. I also got threats from her lawyer and my lawyer wrote her letter then, I never heard from her again. I was lucky my lawyer is an animal advocate. I am sorry, that this behavior of Ms.Eakes has continued for so many years. It is truly sad for the animals involved and the community. My hope is that her cruelty someday stops.

  13. Thank you for emailing me back so quickly. On Saturday, my ten year old and I met Toni and several of her dogs at a Petsmart in RSM. I filled out paperwork, which I assumed was to foster a dog. Before we left she had me sign it. Since I have a King Charles at home, I asked about his vaccinations, worms and flea/tick medicine. She assured me everything was up to date. With all the excitement, I did not get a copy of what I signed. Huge mistake!!! In fact, I did not bring home one piece of paperwork. The next day (Sunday), I called her and asked for a copy of what I had signed and proof of his vaccinations. She was rude and said that I was only fostering and did not have rights to the vaccine records. She also informed me in an email later that night that what I signed was not a foster agreement, but an adoption agreement. She said she had crossed out adoption and put foster on the form (without my knowledge) and asked me to sign it. She still refuses to give me a copy or any records on the dog I brought home. She has been extremely unprofessional and is insisting I sign the foster agreement. The foster contract holds me liable for neutering (which was done by someone already) and that “I must provide proper care (proper food, water & shelter), including necessary medical care, regular checkups and vaccinations as necessary.” It also states that, “I promise and agree to be solely responsible for these animals and to indemnify and hold harmless A Wish for Animals from any and all claims of liability for the conduct of this animal while in my/our home and care. THIS IS A BINDING CONTRACT ENFORCEABLE BY CIVIL LAW.” I find this unacceptable, especially since I am being refused any of the records. I am happy to train, provide a good environment for him to grow in and am in a situation where this would benefit the dog. Her website says foster parents will receive everything from medical care to food at no cost. I found that contradicting and concerning. In addition, on Monday night, two nights after bringing him home with my son and King Charles, I found out the dog had tape worms and fleas. She told me it was easy to take care of and all available at Petsmart. I did not know it would cost me $91. It had only been two days since I had brought him home! I should not be responsible at such an early stage for those costs. When I emailed her (I do have copies of these emails if you want to see them) about reimbursement, and contract concerns, plus I gave her updates on the dog, she refused to pay for the de-worming and flea meds and said I should have waited until this coming Sunday (which would have been 7 days later.) She said she could not afford it. This of course was not an option with my other dog. I didn’t want fleas all over my home or risk getting worms. She didn’t answer any other questions concerning the contract and just stated I needed to sign it. When I brought the dog home she told me he was a lab mix. After researching online, I discovered he is a Rot/Pit Bull Terrier mix. She had no response about my questions on that either. I was informed after bringing him home that he was about 1 1/2 years old and was a shy dog. Then after speaking with her trainer I was told he was most likely a puppy mill dog and knew no life except a cage. Toni was so rude when I asked questions. The dog seemed fearful of people, sounds and cowered like he had been beat. Toni said he had never been beat or aggressive. She treated me like his behavior was my fault. She then very rudely proceeded to lecture me about what I had to do to care for the dog, including which collar I had to use (which slipped right off his head). Not once has she shown gratitude, compassion, appreciation or excitement about the progression of this dog. The trainer who was keeping him for two weeks left him in a large backyard with her 6 Mastiffs. The trainer said a week ago he could not even be pet or walked. When I brought him home, he was clueless what affection was, did not know how to play and still could not be walked. He was nervous about being pet. He has never been in a home environment and was scared to death when I showered and washed dishes. I have worked so hard with him. I hate to give him back to her, but I do not feel like I have a choice. This is a good dog that has an opportunity to grow and be trained, but he is not ready to go into any home. He needs time to learn what home life is and be appealing for adoption. I do not want to make this about me or her. I just am floored by the legal stand point, her demands and unprofessionalism. I fear in the end the dog is going to suffer. I do not know what you recommend. There is more to my story, but those are the main points. I also have the emails as proof. I am an honest, loving, moral divorced mother of 1. I hate drama and avoid it at all costs. This has had a huge impact on me because I have not seen anyone behave so irresponsible, controlling, unethical, dishonest and rude as she is. It is truly disturbing. I have made great progress with the dog. He walks on a leash very well, has learned how to play, smiles, is potty trained, affectionate and discovering what being loved feels like. The progression is unreal. All she seems to care about is herself and money. Thank you for any insight or support you can give. I am very discouraged right now. I also filed a complaint with the BBB. She has had 3 other complaints and her record is an F with them.

Please leave a comment! Thank you very much.

Categories
A - Z: Show me all interviews Fun Stuff and Pet Companies Interviews on packpeople.com Interviews on packpeople.com Lilly Recommends Shelter Animals

‘Original Sock Dogs’ made from scratch – Interview with the founder

I saw a link on a website which transferred me to another website and then another website. I lost track of what I was actual looking for, and somehow I ended up on http://www.sockdogs.com. This is one of the cutest hand crafted ideas I have seen this year. “Original Sock Dogs”… the name says it all. Artisan Stacey’s idea arose after a visit in Taiwan where she met a stray dog. In honor of this special dog. and to support her local Humane Society Organization, she started making original sock dogs from scratch.

Read our interview with Stacey, the founder of Original Sock Dogs, and see how an individual can make a difference in animals’ and people’s lives, by doing what she loves to do.

Original Sock Dogs by Stacey

Specializes In: Handmade Collectible Plush Art

Interviewee: Stacey Hsu – Kansas City, Missouri.

How and when did the idea for your business with handmade sock dogs come about?

Every year, my local shelter, the Humane Society of Greater Kansas City, holds a silent and live pet-themed art auction called Art Unleashed. In the past, I donated small paintings and illustrations, but I wanted to make something different in 2005. I found a great book called, of all things, Stupid Sock Creatures (John Murphy). Instead of making “sock monsters” I decided to make sock dogs to fit with the pet-themed auctions.

What is your background as an artist?

I’ve always enjoyed writing and drawing. When I was 8, I sat in my room and practiced drawing Garfield and Snoopy day and night—mostly to impress my friends and family. I enjoyed drawing so much that I kept up with it, and eventually branched out to other art forms like sculpting, character design and animation.  I have a degree in Advertising, but chose to follow a different path, and worked as an editor, producer and director at Hallmark Cards for 10 years. Now I’m taking care of my kiddos and running my own business from home. (Thank you, Etsy!)

Can you describe to us the material you use for the sock dogs, and the work that goes into making them?

They really are made of socks! (All brand new socks, I might add. I’ve been asked!) Most Original Sock Dogs’ noses are made from big black buttons—there’s just something about those big dog noses! Lately, most of the dogs I’ve been making are customs based on people’s pets. Each one is a new adventure! I learn a little about the dog before I start (personality, etc) and take a good long look at their photos. In a way, I suppose I meditate on all of that before I begin sewing. I want each custom Original Sock Dog to represent the real dog not just in appearance but also in spirit.

What do you love most about handcrafting sock dogs?

It’s so exciting to see a bunch of raw materials transform into a real character. Although the basic elements are the same on many of the sock dogs, they each take on their own shape and attitude. I can’t wait to add the finishing touches and see them spring to life.

Do you also create other animals?

I do! I’ve made seagulls, bunnies, bears and cats out of socks. I also make collectible artist bears from mohair and plush when time allows.

I checked your picture gallery on www.sockdogs.com and your etsy shop on http://www.etsy.com/shop/originalsockdogs. You are an amazing artist – every single sock dog is unique and absolutely adorable (smiling puppy faces)! I have already found my personal favorite. Do you have a favorite sock dog?

I don’t have one single favorite, but there is something really meaningful to me about the Sock Pit Bulls I make. I’ve worked with quite a few Pitties while volunteering at the shelter and they are really amazing, devoted, loving dogs. I’d like to think that I’m helping to soften their image a little, for people who fear or misunderstand the breed.

You offer many different sock dogs as well as custom dogs. If I want you to create a sock dog of my dog, what do I have to do?

To order a custom, all you need to do is visit my etsy shop, purchase a custom listing and email me photos of your dog. All customs are $85 plus shipping.

On your Facebook page people can follow your sock dogs/cats. I read you are fully booked for Christmas 2012 – and congrats! – but you can still do some of the itty pitties, right? And what are itty pitties?

Yes, I can still work in a few itty pitties! They are small (3” high) needle felted Pit Bull puppies that are posable and of course, each is one of a kind. Needle felting is a process of using a very sharp needle to poke and shape wool and other natural fibers. The end results are so cute, I don’t even mind occasionally stabbing my fingers while making them!

For a unique holiday idea, you offer gift certificates. How long does it take to finish a single custom sock dog and how much does it cost?

From start to finish, a custom can take anywhere from 4-12 hours. It depends on the complexity of the markings, the type of coat the animals has (long or short) and other distinguishing features or special requests. The time it takes to have it ready for a customer also depends on how many orders are already on the schedule—it’s first come, first served!

What is the secret of your success? Do you have any ideas, tips or advice for the next talented artist who might want to start a business like yours?

You have to love what you do. If you don’t have a huge passion for your craft, you just won’t stick with it. I have a 5 year old, a 2 year old, a husband and 4 pets that need me, and even when I’m dead tired at the end of the day, I still look forward to heading into my studio and designing and sewing the dogs. If you have a love of what you do and make, it will show in the finished product.  You might also consider donating a portion of your sales to a non-profit or mission that is close to your heart. It keeps you going, knowing that you are helping someone other than yourself!

You are an animal rescue supporter, you volunteer at your local no-kill shelter, and you donate 10% of your sock dog sales to the Humane Society of Greater Kansas City. Why are volunteers important for animal shelters and what have you learned through your work at the Humane Society?

Volunteers are absolutely essential to shelters. They are the glue that holds all of the shelter efforts together. They help coordinate events, help garner donations, take dogs out for adoption days, and spend one on one time with cats and dogs that need socialization, love and affection. I started volunteering to get my “dog fix”—I didn’t have any at the time. Now I have two dogs and two cats—all from shelters. So if you decide to volunteer, get ready to fall hopelessly in love with the animals you meet.

I saw the cute Johnny Justice Sock Dogs on your Facebook Fan Page. Can you tell us a little about “Johnny Justice”?

Jonny is one of the Pit Bulls rescued from Michael Vick’s dog fighting kennels. He was adopted by a loving family and has been certified as a service dog. He has worked in libraries, helping kids learn to read, and is a goodwill ambassador for his breed.

Can you describe an experience that has particularly moved or inspired you?

During a trip to Taiwan in 2004, my husband and I came across a stray black dog with an injured front leg. She was being bullied by the other strays—chased away from food scraps, snapped at, it was awful. She basically attached herself to me and followed me around all morning. My heart seriously broke that day.

This is the cute dog Stacey met in Taiwan.

I wanted so much to just fold her in my arms and take her with me. But we were traveling by train, and not knowing the country or the language very well, I felt helpless about the situation. We bought her a warm meal at a street vendor and sat with her while she ate, to protect her from the other dogs. I cried the whole way back on the train, and for days after. I vowed to do something to help other dogs like her when we returned to the states, and that’s why I started volunteering. I’ve always loved animals, but I think that sweet girl gave my compassion levels a huge boost—ever since I’ve been dedicated to finding ways to help the animals, through sharing my time and my art.

In general, why should people adopt from a rescue?

If you are looking for a companion, someone to love who will love you back unconditionally—please adopt from a shelter. There are so many animals waiting in shelters for loving homes. And every time a dog or cat is adopted from a shelter, space opens up for another homeless animal who otherwise wouldn’t have a chance to find a forever home. I also believe that shelter animals know they have been “rescued” and possess a special kind of gratitude toward their people.

If you could give pet owners one piece of advice what would it be?

Love them while they are here. Their lives are so short—never take them for granted.

Do you have pets of your own?

My two dogs, Lolly and Ava are both from the shelter where I volunteer. They are black dogs, which are very often overlooked in shelters. They are also two of the most loving, devoted, goofy, wonderful girls ever. Our two cats, also from shelters, think that they own us!

Which websites or pet-related books would you recommend to PackPeople?

I would definitely recommend that everyone check out their local shelter or rescue’s web site. Get to know what they are about, what they need, and how you can help out. There are so many ways, big and little, to pitch in and make life better for these wonderful dogs and cats. I’d also recommend taking a look at bestfriends.org and gentlebarn.org.

In terms of print publications, I am a big fan of The Bark Magazine. Great articles and a pro-rescue point of view.

Website: http://www.sockdogs.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Original-Sock-Dogs

Etsy-Shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/originalsockdogs

Original Sock Dogs is also a proud member of HeArtsSpeak.

Categories
Adoption Articles Cool and Fun Stuff News Shelter Animals

L.A. Love & Leashes Benefit Event – The first non-profit pet store

Hey PackPeople,

We need your support: my friend Marissa is volunteering for a great organization in Los Angeles called L.A. Love & Leashes and she has asked me to help get them some exposure. Please read what they do and how you can help support their awesome work.

This Thursday night, June 28th, there is a special benefit for L.A. Love & Leashes – the first non-profit run “pet store” that adopts out only animals from L.A.’s city animal shelters. Milo Greene, an LA-based band getting some big buzz recently (on Letterman Tuesday, profiled in the LA Times over the weekend http://soc.li/c0TUntD and sold out the Troubador last week) is playing. There will be an open bar, food (passed appetizers) by celebrity chef Sepi Kashanian and there is plenty of onsite parking.

If 100 tickets are sold, L.A. Love & Leashes can renew its lease after the summer. In their first six months, they’ve adopted out 224 dogs and cats (and one hamster) from LA’s city shelters. It’s a new, humane model for pet stores and the first and only store of its kind supporting our city shelters in L.A.

You can learn more and buy tickets on their website:  www.LALoveandLeashes.com/Events – Make a donation here.

Where and when?: Thursday, June 28th, 7:30 – 10 p.m., 2750 Casitas St., Los Angeles, CA 90039

Please support this creative new model to increase shelter adoptions! Thank you for sharing and supporting.

L.A.’s first pet adoption store for rescued shelter pets.
Categories
Animal Welfare Groups and Rescues Created for Rescues and Non-Profits Interviews on packpeople.com Interviews on packpeople.com Non - Profits Shelter Animals

Rescued animals fly on the wings of love – Interview with Debi from Pilots N Paws [Audio]

Pilots N Paws is a non-profit organization founded in 2008 by animal lover Debi Boies and pilot Jon Wehrenberg, an online platform created to provide free plane transport for shelter and foster animals and rescue organizations – served by volunteer pilots. I remember last year when I was looking desperately for safe transportation for our little kitty “Thursday”, now “Luna”; her new family was in Florida and we were in Los Angeles. It was not an easy task to get Luna safely to her new family, but we were able to organize her transport by car. Unfortunately, I didn’t know about the great services of Pilots N Paws at that time, and it took Luna 3 days to reach her family (read Luna’s story).

I heard of Pilots N Paws from a rescue friend and was thrilled that a non-profit organization was offering this free service of transporting animals by plane. I browsed through the website’s blog, stories and pictures and spent an hour looking at them and reading the happy stories. Pictures really do tell the story!

If you are looking for an opportunity to get your pooch, kitty, rabbit or piggy from one destination to another and don’t know how, you should visit Pilotsnpaws.org and request a flight (no long-distance flights). Today, a dedicated formation of 2466 pilots volunteer their time and donate free flights for Pilots N Paws furry or non-furry pawssengers. Animals can experience safe, fast and comfortable travel with experienced pilots. Flights are not scheduled, and there are no costs involved:) for participating groups.

I’m flying home!

Debi Boies and Pilots N Paws have received honors and awards from all over the country, including the Broadway Barks Award/Bernadette Peters and Mary Tyler Moore, the American Dog Magazine’s 1st Annual Humanitarian Award, the Pets and Heroes award from the Amazing Grace Foundation and many more. She is listed as one of the top “25 Pet People of 2010” at Petside.com.

We had the great pleasure of talking to Debi, Co-Founder and President of Pilots N Paws and finding out more about this wonderful organization. Debi is the winner of the Pet Hero Award 2012  and her organization is Rescue Organization of the Year. Congratulations!

Please listen, learn and share how you can benefit from Pilots N Paws’s services, how you can join the organization, how you can request a flight and how the organization makes an impact on the plight of homeless animals. Debi also shared with us her special moments, and why she founded Pilots N Paws. Kudos to all volunteers, Debi and her team for their wonderful efforts!

You want to know more? The new book Dog Is My Copilot: Rescue Tales of Flying Dogs, Second Chances, and the Hero Who Might Live Next Door just arrived at the bookstore.

Greyhound Janine is flying high.

Pilots N Paws is able to continue their terrific work through the help and support of their fantastic sponsors, Subaru and Petmate.

Take your time, visit and like Pilots N Paws’s Facebook Fan page and blog, read the stories, have a look at the pictures, read the guidelines and resources. I promise it’s worth it:)

Website: www.pilotsnpaws.org

Twitter: PilotsNPaws

YouTube Channel: PilotsNPaws

If you liked the interview please share it with your community or feel free to leave a comment. Thank you for making an impact!

If you see any typos please send us an e-mail to info@packpeople.com – Thank you!

Related posts: We also interviewed Pet Airways last year.

Categories
Adoption Articles Shelter Animals

Shelter Pets need your help – Support and Share "The Shelter Pet Project"

Hey, PackPeople – HAPPY THANKSGIVING

Today is a special day to give, consider to give a dog or a cat a loving forever home. Many, many dogs and cats are waiting for you in shelters and animal rescues. They will give unconditional Love, Companionship and Trust for sure if you reach out to them. Here is a great campaign if you want to get involved in Animal Welfare.

We want to get a very special message to all of you to please share the word about The Shelter Pet Project. This public service campaign from The Humane Society, Maddie’s Fund and the Ad Council wants people to adopt a shelter or rescued pet, rather than buying one. As the campaign so rightly says, “A person is the best thing to happen to a shelter pet.”

Learn more about the campaign here.

Here’s what you can do… please

“Like” the Shelter Pet Project on Facebook   http://www.facebook.com/shelterpetproject
Follow the Shelter Pet Project on Twitter   http://www.twitter.com/shelterpets
Watch and share their great YouTube videos   http://www.youtube.com/theshelterpetproject

You can also write about the campaign yourselves – remember, sharing information is one of the first steps to saving lives!

Much gratitude and warmest wishes,

Rufino and Yurda

Categories
Get informed and educated Interviews on packpeople.com Non - Profits Pet Care Shelter Animals

Helping rescues and shelters evaluate dogs – Interview with Dr. Amy Marder from the Center for Shelter Dogs

Dedicated to improving the welfare of homeless dogs cared for by humane organizations, animal control facilities and rescue groups, the Center for Shelter Dogs is a free program of the Animal Rescue League in Boston and provides expert knowledge through workshops and other educational offerings.

Dr. Amy Marder is a Clinical Behaviorist and leads the Center, which draws on the expertise of its staff to incorporate clinical medicine and epidemiology into its strategies, establishing a world-class program on behalf of shelter dogs.

We had the great honor of interviewing Dr. Amy Marder, and talking about the innovative Match-Up II Shelter Dog Rehoming Program, as well as the most common behavioral issues of shelter dogs and how rescues and other animal welfare groups can learn to improve every dog’s life in a shelter through Match-Up II Online.

Web: http://www.centerforshelterdogs.org and www.matchupiionline.centerforshelterdogs.org

Facebook: Center for Shelter Dogs

Twitter: @Ctr4ShelterDogs

Match-Up II Online:   www.matchupiionline.centerforshelterdogs.org to find out more about the next free Match-Up II Online webinar. Next Match-Up II Online training webinar: Thursday, November 17, 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. (Eastern) – to begin registration, send an email to Dr. Amy Marder at amarder@arlboston.org

Yurda attended the Match-Up II Online Webinar with Dr. Amy Marder, and found that Dr. Marder and her team have designed a program which is not only very effective but also easy to use [It’s a free Webinar – and I was astonished at how detailed and elaborate it was. A team of professionals and experts have come together to create an extremely well-thought-out program. – Yurda].

Dr. Amy Marder’s recommended link/websites:

Association of Shelter Veterinarians – features ASV Guidelines for Standards of Care in Animal Shelters:   www.sheltervet.org

Animal Farm Foundation – Securing equal treatment and opportunity for “Pit Bull” dogs:   www.animalfarmfoundation.org

National Canine Research Council – Preserving the Human-Canine Bond:   www.nationalcanineresearchcouncil.com

Spreading the word can help save lives! Please share this work with your community by clicking the Facebook and Twitter icons or feel free to leave a comment. Thank you for making an impact.

iTunes News: Get PackPeople’s interviews as a Podcast!

[nggallery id=58]

Categories
Books and Movies Lilly Recommends Pet Care Shelter Animals

Special Guest Blog from Holli Pfau, author of "Pure Gold: Adventures with Six Rescued Golden Retrievers"

We’re thrilled to receive this very special guest entry from author Holli Pfau, whose new book shares a powerful, touching journey while giving hope and help to the dogs and organizations who make the human, and humane, experience a richer one. We’ll also be featuring an interview with Holli next month, so please stay close and enjoy our talk with her in November as she shares even more of her important story with all of us. – Yurda and Rufino

From Holli Pfau:

They arrive on our doorsteps with issues and baggage.

Sometimes it’ s evident right away – the guarded, wary eyes, the thin frame and brittle coat, or the fear of men’s boots or sudden noises.

Sometimes it shows up later, in an x-ray that reveals old injuries, or congenital defects that will require surgery and rehabilitation.

But what’s soon revealed – given time, attention, love and tender care – are the true gifts of the heart. The eyes that begin to show trust and love again. The coat that begins to shine. The confidence that life will be worth living again.

These are rescued dogs, those that were once cast aside, discarded, or ignored. These are the lucky ones, now embraced by their families and safe from harm. What will happen now is the remarkable bond between humans and dogs, one of the true joys in life. I’ve been blessed to live with six rescued or second-hand golden retrievers and to see how the bond blooms, and how everyone’ s lives are enriched, often beyond any possible expectation.

My first golden, Nikki, arrived as a three-month-old, saved from euthanasia when a nurse carefully bottle raised her so her cleft palate could heal and she wouldn’ t drown on milk. Nikki grew into a beautiful dog who bestowed stunning gifts as a hospital therapy dog.

Bodie’ s congenital eye problem caused his first owners to return him, saying he wasn’ t perfect. We adopted the lanky youth, had the surgery done… and then Bo also became a happy therapy dog and a superb wilderness hiker.

Tucker was relinquished by his family around six months of age, probably because the mother couldn’t deal with a young dog and a houseful of children, too. One month after we adopted him and fell in love with his gentle spirit, he was diagnosed with bilateral hip dysplasia. Two months post-op, he was hiking trails again and lived a long, pain-free life.

Sophie had languished for her first year of life in a breeder’s kennel. She had never been in a house or in a car, or received any training at all. Sweet to the core, she soon blossomed into a spunky little sprite who became Tucker’ s faithful companion.

Then Daisy arrived. Or had she been catapulted over the fence and flung into our yard? Six months old, she had already had two homes and had been relinquished to the humane society. She burst into our placid household and careened through our days like a sports car stuck in high gear. Smart, athletic and totally lacking in self control, she needed a job. Agility was the perfect choice, and after years of patient and persistent training, she’s earned numerous titles.

Tender little Chatter brought resigned eyes that reflected her barren and neglected youth. Still trying to fill the empty spaces, she craves attention and has trouble containing her newly found enthusiasm for life. She’ s a rising star in our hospital’ s pet therapy program, where she can soak up all the attention lavished on her. Now those deep brown eyes reflect joy and contentment.

Yes, the challenges can be huge, but the rewards are, too. Each dog needed help – medical, emotional, behavioral. But with that help, they flourished. They enjoyed every day to the fullest. And they enriched and transformed my life beyond measure. I’ve been blessed to travel many paths alongside these remarkable dogs. They’ve taken me places I never woud have found without them, and I’m grateful for the journey. So to honor them, and all the gold the’ ve brought into my life, I’m dedicating the profits from my memoir, Pure Gold: Adventures with Six Rescued Golden Retrievers, to shelters, humane societies and rescue programs across the country. It’s the least I can do to help needy dogs find their forever homes.

Meet the Author: Holli Pfau 

Holli - Daisy - Chatter

A third generation Trojan, Holli graduated from the University of Southern California with a degree in English and, years later, added a BS degree in Therapeutic Recreation from California State University, Northridge. Holli’s long career in advertising took a back seat to the adventures her goldens would bring to her life, as they arrived on her doorstep one by one.

Blessed with the animal-loving gene, Holli shared her early years with a menagerie in southern California. So after an 18-year career in marketing, it’s no surprise that she returned to her roots, inspired by her first golden retriever, Nikki. Credentialed by her second college degree, in therapeutic recreation, she co-founded PAT at Huntington, a program of animal-assisted therapy that became a national model. But the Rocky Mountains lured, and she now lives with her husband in Colorado. Holli continues to be humbled, challenged, charmed and entertained by two frisky golden retrievers, Daisy and Chatter.

Book Details:

  • Pub. Date: October 2011
  • Publisher: Glad Dog Press LLC
  • Format: Hardcover , 263pp
  • ISBN: 9780983645108
  • US/CAN $24.95
Categories
Adoption Non - Profits Pit Bulls Shelter Animals

Pictures of current Adoptable Shelter Dogs – East Valley Shelter/Van Nuys, CA

Hey Dog – Lovers, we’re reaching out to you with this weeks Adoptable Shelter Dogs. I visited the East Valley Animal Shelter, CA this morning and took some pictures. Great dogs are waiting for homes. Please help sharing! [nggallery id=55]

Categories
Animal Stories Pet Care Shelter Animals

Lost Dog Ty reunited with his family after 2 weeks – Miracles do happen

Tysons Lost Dog Poster

For a handsome Pit Bull, Ty (short for Tyson) and his family, October 11th, 2011 will always be a special day. That’s when they were reunited after Ty had been lost for almost 2 weeks. Let’s backtrack: I work for Pacific Coast Dog Rescue (www.pcdogrescue.org), one of the largest rescue organizations in the Los Angeles area. We house about 100 rescue dogs, some of which are special needs dogs who need regular medical attention. Consequently, I spend a lot of time at our vet, Animal Medical Center in Van Nuys, CA.

On September 30th, while I was waiting in the vet’s lobby, a man brought in a very sweet neutered male Pit Bull. The man had found him on the street nearby. No collar and no tags. (NOTE from the author: I have picked up about 300 dogs from the streets within the last 8 years. Only 4 of those dogs had tags and nearly none of them were spayed/neutered). But the dog seemed very well taken care of, he was in good shape and was pretty clean, as if he just had a bath.

According to procedure, the dog was scanned for a microchip. An AVID chip was located so the vet contacted the microchip company. The dog had been chipped to a woman who now lives in Colorado and had given the dog to somebody else. When that person was contacted, they claimed to have given the dog to somebody else. The number provided on the chip lead to one dead end after another.

So the options for this poor baby weren’t great: if he was brought to the shelter, he would most likely be euthanized after a few days (the six Los Angeles City Shelters and the six Los Angeles County Shelters euthanize an average of about 1,200 Pit Bulls PER WEEK). Since our rescue is full, and most other rescues are full, we asked the vet to hold on to this handsome boy for a little while. We were going to do our best to try and find him a home. The reality is that it takes several months, sometimes years, to find a GOOD home for a Pit Bull, especially an adult Pit Bull. Ty was estimated to be between 5 to 7 years old. Most people want puppies or young (1-2 year old) dogs, and most people do not want Pit Bulls. In short, we needed a miracle. And that’s what we got, but in a different (and much better) way than expected.

Our volunteer Leslie, and I met on Tuesday, October 11th at the vet’s office to take Ty (who we had named Stanley) out in the neighborhood for a photo and video shoot. We were going to post his info on several websites to try and find him a home. We found a nice, shady, grassy area to take photos in, and we gave him some toys and a little bandana so he would look extra cute in his pictures. We took a ton of great photos and decided to take a walk in the neighborhood nearby to find a nice spot for a video. As we were walking, I told Leslie how funny it would be if the Ty’s owners just happened to see us walking him.

After a little walk, we settled on a nice lawn and Leslie and Ty were the stars of our little adoption video. Having captured some great photos and footage, we started walking back to our car. Suddenly, an SUV pulled up next to us and a woman rolled down the window. She was very excited and asked us if we had found this dog. We told her that somebody had found him and brought him to our vet. She shouted, “That’s our dog! It’s Ty! He has been missing for almost 2 weeks!” I still get goosebumps when I think about this moment. They stopped their car in the middle of the street and the woman, her husband, and their daughter jumped out of the car. They were in complete shock as they embraced Ty. It was a wonderful reunion, with Ty snuggling up in their arms.

I asked the woman, whose name was Debra, to show us some proof that Ty was really their missing dog. She showed us pictures of Ty on her cellphone, and it was clearly him! Everybody kept talking over everyone else because it was such a great moment. Debra, her husband Michael, and their daughter were in total disbelief that they just happened to be driving down this street at the right moment. What a miracle! And then they told us what had happened to Ty…

They had bathed him (remember, when he was found and brought into the vet’s office, it seemed like he had just had a bath) and then let him go potty in the yard. They left for a couple of hours to give food to the homeless people in the area, which they do regularly. While they were gone, it started to rain. Ty had a history of getting anxiety when the weather was bad. So, in his anxiousness, he chewed through the fence and got out. He wasn’t wearing his collar/tag since he had just had a bath and was drying off. (NOTE from the author: Please make sure to never let your dog into the yard without proper ID. Keep your dog indoors after a bath until you put collar/tags back on the dog.) Debra and Michael had adopted Ty about 6 years ago from a local, well known rescue who FAILED to check/change the microchip information, which could have resulted in Ty’s death if he had ended up in the shelter. We all went back to the vet’s office because I couldn’t release Ty to his family without getting approval from the vet. Dr. Nunez and the staff at Animal Medical Center were overjoyed about the wonderful news. Everybody had fallen in love with Ty during his short stay there.

We took this picture to post it - It was not necessary:)

Ironically, Debra had been referred to Animal Medical Center by a friend right before Ty had gotten out. Ty had a minor skin problem that they wanted to get checked out. The vet that was referred to them happened to be the same vet that Ty was brought to when he was found. Michael told us that he had just bought steak and fish for Ty right before his disappearance. When he went missing, they had checked the shelters (both in person and online), made lost dog posters, and posted ads on Craigslist and other pet search engines. They also recently had their fence reinforced with a metal grating so that none of their dogs would ever get out again.

When they were reunited, Michael rushed home to get Ty’s collar, tag, and leash. After we said an emotional goodbye to Ty, he and his family, now complete again, went home to reunite Ty with his little dog brother!

Categories
Adoption Interviews on packpeople.com Non - Profits Shelter Animals

Are you looking for a dog over 100 lb.? – Interview with Big Dogs Huge Paws CEO Lindsay

We had the pleasure interviewing the CEO of Big Dogs Huge Paws last week. Big Dogs Huge Paws was founded on the core philosophy that every “BIG” dog deserves a chance and all dogs of Giant breeds like Mastiffs, Great Danes, Saint Bernards and every dog over 100 lb is welcome at Big Dogs Huge Paws. This organization ensures that all dogs are properly evaluated and placed according to their special needs.

Trained by professional behaviorists each foster home knows how to handle introductions, properly evaluate dogs, work through specific behavioral issues, etc. Foster families undergo quarterly training sessions in order to maintain everyone’s skills and abilities and ensure that the entire foster team is on the same page and has the tools they need for success. Big Dogs Huge Paws is working toward a special therapy dog training program.

Over 1050 giant dogs got already adopted through this organization and most of the gentle giants go home trained. On the website of Big Dogs Huge Paws you can find very useful information and articles about Nutrition, Health Care, Training tips and Breeds explained. If you always dreamt of a huge dog with a big heart you should check the over 100 dogs at this organization. PackPeople love giant breed dogs and already fall in love with the one of the dogs called BUSTER a Bull Mastiff – what a sweet face.

Listen to Lindsay’s interview and learn how you can find your new giant friend and what to expect in adopting from Big Dogs Huge Paws.
Big Dogs Huge Paws Rescue – Interview with Lindsay Condon by PackPeople 

Big Dogs Huge Paws:

Web: http://bigdogshugepaws.com

Twitter: @BigDogsHugePaws

Facebook: Big Dogs Huge Paws

In addition to the many resources provided on http://bigdogshugepaws.com, Lindsay also recommends following books:

  • The Other End of the Leash- Patricia McConnell, PhD
  • For The Love of a Dog- Patricia McConnell, PhD
  • Before & After Getting Your Puppy- Dr. Ian Dunbar
  • How to Teach a New Dog Old Tricks- Dr. Ian Dunbar
  • Help for your Fearful Dog- Nicole Wilde
  • The Well-Adjusted Dog- Dr. Nicolas Dodman
  • When Pigs Fly: Training Success With Impossible –  Dogs-Jane Killion

Spreading the word can help save lives! If you liked the interview please share it with your community by clicking the Facebook and Twitter icons at the bottom of this article or feel free to leave a comment. Thank you.

iTunes News: Get PackPeople’s interviews as a Podcast!

[nggallery id=54]